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56. Cops and Robbers
Synopsis
Scotty's mother and sister are taken hostage by an old friend who offers to exchange their lives for some valuable microfilm.

[Location: USA]

French title: Souvenirs d’enfance


Guest Stars
Jim Brown (Tommy), Beah Richards (Mother), Rupert Crosse (Chester), Hazel Medina (Jo), Bob Kline (Clerk), James Seay (Salesman), Russell Robinson (Boy #2), Mark Brown (Boy #1)

Written by
Jerry Ludwig

Directed by
Christian Nyby

Original Airdate
12 April 1967

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Currently available on DVD
(UPC: 14381983524)
Review
Kelly and Scotty are passing through the latter's hometown of Philadelphia on their way to Washington to deliver some valuable microfilm containing spy plane photos of enemy installations, and stop off to visit Scotty's mom, only to discover that she and daughter Jo are being held hostage by Scott's childhood friend Tommy and his sinister cohort Chester. Tommy is working for the other side, and he wants the microfilm. He doesn't intend to leave any witnesses, either. Scott must find a way to rescue his family or become a traitor and turn over the microfilm.
This well-written and superbly acted episode is the directorial debut of Christian Nyby, who would go on to helm numerous third season episodes. But best of all it is graced with the presence of Beah Richards, who portrays Scott's mother. Richard nails the character perfectly, giving us just the kind of woman who would raise the kind of man that Alexander Scott turned out to be. Jim Brown does a credible job for a football star just launching an acting career, and Rupert Crosse is, as always, great as the menacing Chester. Kudos must also go to Bill Cosby, utterly convincing as a family-oriented man who discovers that the spy business is not a comfortable profession for someone with scruples. None of the actors involved are seduced by the material into making the mistake of overt sentimentality. Indeed, the tension mounts for 51 minutes to a nerve-wracking crescendo, and Nyby doesn't lets the viewer off the hook.